I Drank Red Raspberry Leaf Tea And Here Is How It Went!

I Drank Red Raspberry Leaf Tea And Here Is How It Went!

I love drinking hot teas and I have since I was 15 years old. The warmth and the different flavors relax me while exciting my tastes buds.

The idea that the different plants used to make these teas can possibly have health benefits, is really interesting to me.

I experienced a bout of nausea again the day before my period was set to start in this last menstrual cycle. Peppermint tea is a common thing I use to quell it but this time I decided to try red raspberry leaf instead.

In this post, I will talk a little bit about these leaves and my experience drinking them in tea form!

Some information on red raspberry leaf

The raspberry plant is native to Europe and Asia. While not the most popular fruit to eat in the world, it still has a nutrient profile that many people love.

The leaves that come along with this fruit are also edible and considered to be nutritious. They contain vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, calcium, iron, potassium and antioxidants.

 If you are interested in consuming the leaves, they need to be gathered before the plant blooms and done in mid-morning. Once you have gotten all the leaves you want, you will need to dry them. When they can crumble easily in your fingers, they are ready to be stored in an airtight container (keep the leaves whole when you store them).

 To make tea with the leaves, it is best to use one tablespoon per eight ounces of boiling water. The leaves need to be steeped for around ten minutes for a full-strength cup (or cups) of tea.

Red raspberry leaf tea has a nice fruity smell to it. There is no fruity taste to the tea though. Most people who drink it say the flavor is more like that of black tea.

You can find red raspberry leaf sold in tea bags, whole leaves, liquid extract and capsules.

Alleged benefits

Red raspberry leaves are said to provide some specific health benefits. They are as follows:

  1. Induces labor
  2. Balances hormones in women
  3. Reduces the severity of menstrual cramps
  4. Lightens period flow
  5. Relieves nausea/morning sickness
  6. Boosts the immune system
  7. Soothes sore throats

There is very little scientific evidence behind any of these benefits. You can find a lot of anecdotal evidence for these though!

Science does show that red raspberry leaf may have some estrogenic effects to it. It is best to be aware of that if you choose to consume it.

My experience with red raspberry leaf tea

So as stated before, I had some gnarly nausea before my period was going to start in this past cycle.

When I looked into the cabinet that I keep my tea in, I saw that I had some red raspberry leaf tea from Traditional Medicinals. I remembered that I had bought it a while back for the nausea and menstrual cramp benefits. This made me decide to have a cup of it.

I made sure that it was not expired first so I did not make my stomach situation worse. Since the bags had not gone bad, I went ahead and made one cup to start off.

I sweetened my cup of the tea with sucralose (yes, I realize that is considered bad). The taste of it was very pleasant and was indeed like black tea. I liked it a lot.

It was easy to get down despite the way I was feeling. Within 15 minutes or so of drinking it, I began to have some relief from the nausea. It was not totally gone, but it was getting better.

I decided to have another cup because it tasted so good to me. After the second one, I felt even better!

A third cup was not necessary.

Permanently part of my nausea fighting arsenal

I do not know what makes these leaves helpful for nausea but I am not going to complain. It tastes better than peppermint tea and it works really well. I will be drinking it in the days before my period from now on.

Have any of you had red raspberry leaf tea? If so, did you like it?

Thanks for reading!

Some sources-

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/red-raspberry-leaf

https://www.britannica.com/plant/raspberry

#herbaltea  #tea  #health  #womenshealth  #menstrualcycle  #periodproblems   #pms  #nausea

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