What I Learned From Tracking My Health

What I Learned From Tracking My Health

Months ago, I created my very own book that combined a health tracker and daily planner all in one. I did this because I wanted to be able to do these two things daily without having to get two different books.

I am coming up on a year of using these and it has been pretty eye opening for me. In this post, I will be discussing what I have learned about myself in the past five months.

What health stuff I track and why

Ever since about two weeks after I had COVID-19, I have experienced many different symptoms that can be attributed to post-viral syndrome (I have a whole post about that). I am also really sensitive to hormonal fluctuations which has caused uncomfortable symptoms. These two things combined have greatly disrupted my life.

After a couple months of the post-COVID symptoms, I decided that I was going to start tracking how I felt each day. I began tracking my mental/physical status, the food/supplements I consumed and what day I was on in my menstrual cycle. I have kept up with doing this since then.

The reasoning behind tracking everything has been to see if there are any correlations and/or causations. Finding any may help me figure out how to fix things or be able to anticipate things happening so I am prepared.

What I have learned from tracking my health

As I stated above, tracking has been eye opening. Looking over these five months and analyzing everything has made me realize that I am not out of the woods yet with the post-COVID and menstrual cycle issues.

Here are the things that I have learned:

Post-COVID/general-

  • May-June were horrible overall. I had lots of bouts of my post-COVID crud (GI, neurological, respiratory and heart issues). I guess I was too proud to admit that the symptoms didn’t totally go away.
  • I am groggy on days without vitamin B12.
  • Allergy-type symptoms (itchy nose, swollen throat, itchy skin) are a regular thing for me. I believe this is another post-viral annoyance combined with a mast cell issue.
  • I will randomly have actual cold-like symptoms about three days out of the month. I have gone to get drive-through PCR swab tests but they are always negative. This must be a post-viral thing, too.
  • I was taking turmeric and Aspirin because I read that they can have health benefits that are needed during the pandemic. Things were going good with them for a while but within the past few months they started to mess with my GI system. I am no longer able to consume them.
  • My mental state consists of being happy and motivated most of the time.
  • I have developed heat stroke symptoms whenever I try to mow the lawn for some reason.

Menstrual cycle-

Before I start with the list, I wanted to give an explanation of the “GI and mental distress times” that you will see on it. This is when I get extremely anxious, upset, worried and experience horrible stomach issues (pain, bloating, nausea and sometimes loose stool) all at the same time.

Here are some general things about my menstrual cycle symptoms:

  • Since taking the full dosage of Claritin everyday starting in early July, my GI and mental distress times have reduced greatly. They don’t last for more than 1.5 hours and I am able to just breath through them most of the time.
  • Any hormonal nausea I do get that is too intense for me is taken away by red raspberry leaf tea and half of a Meclizine tablet.
  • The length of my cycles switched from 27 days to 31 days and then back to 27 again. I am not sure why this happened. PCOS maybe?

My last two cycles yielded pretty much the same symptoms on all 27 days of them. Here is a play-by-play of what I experienced during them-

  • Days 1-4: Menstrual cramps (days 1-2), fatigue, mild headache, low appetite, post nasal drip, happy and focused.
  • Days 5-8: Itchy eyes, post-nasal drip, happy, motivated, focused and bloody gums.
  • Days 9-11: No physical symptoms, happy and motivated.
  • Days 12-15: Leg aches, bloating, appetite increase, lightheadedness upon standing, ovary aches (day 14), GI/mental distress time (day 15), happy most of the time and bouts of sadness.
  • Days 16-19: Appetite increase, good energy for workouts, irritable at times, happy at times and easily startled.
  • Days 20-23: Lightheadedness at times, irritable at times, happy most of the time, some bloating and not enough energy to workout on day 22.
  • Day 24-27: Tender breasts, nesting, neck aches, nausea (day 26), smell of blood in my genital area, insomnia, some bloating, rumination, irritability and night sweats.

The main takeaway

What I take from all of this information is that I have some health issues that I probably won’t be cured of. All I can do is keep managing my symptoms so that my life is not disrupted further. Things have been going pretty good lately and I want that to continue on.

Do any of you track your daily health symptoms?

Thanks for reading!

If you are interested, you can find one of my health tracker/daily planners here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0915M7S3B

#journalsandplanners #health #women #nonbinary #pms #pmddtreatment #postviralsyndrome #COVID19 #symptoms #mentalhealth #physicalhealth #hormonalproblems #pcos

Red Raspberry Leaf for Menstrual cycles

Red Raspberry Leaf for Menstrual cycles

Some of us have to deal with uncomfortable symptoms during our menstrual cycles. These can be mild or so bad that they hinder our lives.

People with these symptoms, usually look for relief from them. There are quite a few things on the market that may help and red raspberry leaf is one of them.

For this post, information about the leaves and how they may provide relieve will be presented.

Icky hormonal symptoms

Our menstrual cycles come with hormonal fluctuations. Depending on one’s body, the reaction to these fluctuations may be quite poor. These bad reactions are what causes the pesky symptoms that plague a lot of people each cycle.

The symptoms are most commonly experienced in the luteal phase (PMS/PMDD) of our cycle and during our periods. They can also show up a couple of days before ovulation, the day of ovulation and for a couple of days after our periods end.

The symptoms that people may experience include the following:

  • GI issues (loose stools, gassiness, constipation, nausea etc.).
  • Acne
  • Body aches and pains.
  • A sore throat, runny nose, stuffy nose and sneezing (lesser known symptoms!).
  • Headaches and migraines.
  • Abdominal and pelvic cramps.
  • Ovarian pain during ovulation.
  • Mood issues.
  • Fatigue and/or insomnia.
  • Lightheadedness/dizziness.
  • Cravings and increased hunger.
  • Heavy bleeding during periods.
  • Spotting in between periods.

There are other possible symptoms than what is on this list but those are the most common ones. Some people deal with the same ones each month at the same intensity or there may be some variations.

About red raspberry leaves

Raspberries are one of many types of berries and they are one of the most popular among them. As loved as they are, not very many people know that the leaves from the raspberry plant possibly have a slew of benefits.

If you have a raspberry plant and are interested in using the leaves, you must harvest them before the plant blooms. They are then to be dried until they can be crumbled easily. It is best to wait to crumble them until right when you are ready to use them though.

Most people who use red raspberry leaves, make tea with them. This can be done by steeping one tablespoon of the crumbled leaves in one cup of boiling water for 10-15 minutes. The smell of this tea is said to be very pleasant with a fruity, black tea flavor to it. People also say it is slightly sweet on it’s own.

You can also get red raspberry leaves in prepared tea bags, liquid drops, capsules and K-Cups.

There are numerous nutrients in these leaves. They include vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, B vitamins, calcium, iron, potassium and magnesium. It may also have some other antioxidant properties as well.

How it may help during menstrual cycles

Red raspberry leaves have been used as traditional medicine since around the mid 1700s. There has been a combination of anecdotal and some scientific evidence that it actually helps.

The hormonal symptoms it may help with include the following:

  • Menstrual cramps
  • Heavy periods
  • Spotting in between periods
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Sore throat
  • Breast pain
  • Fatigue

It has been said that these leaves may be helpful due to the nutrient and antioxidant content. Most notable is the vitamin B6, calcium and magnesium that they contain. These are nutrients that have been shown to help with hormonal symptoms by balancing things out.

To see if red raspberry leaves help with one’s menstrual cycle, drinking the tea or taking capsules are options. If one chooses to drink the tea- no more than three cups a day is recommended. If one chooses to take capsules instead of tea- up to 900 mg per day is recommended.

Red raspberry leaves can be taken every single day to prevent symptoms, during the luteal phase of one’s cycle or whenever it is needed.

Other possible benefits

There are some other things that red raspberry leaves could possibly help with. They are as follows:

  • Morning sickness.
  • Inducing labor- Very, very little evidence for this so don’t count on it.
  • Respiratory viruses and all that comes with them.
  • GI viruses and all that comes with them.
  • Non-hormonal headaches and migraines.
  • Non-hormonal diarrhea.
  • Relief of skin conditions such as eczema and rashes.
  • Increase of insulin sensitivity.

It is important to note that there also may be some estrogenic effects so anyone who is sensitive to that hormone should be careful.

My use of red raspberry leaves

I found out about using red raspberry leaves for menstrual cycle symptoms years ago. At first, I tried to drink three cups of the tea a day but I got kind of sick of that. I then switched to taking capsules of it daily.

As I recall, doing this really helped reduce my symptoms. I didn’t experience much in the way of nausea as I usually did and my menstrual cramps were all but non-existent.

I remember being very excited that I found something that helped me. After a while, I completely stopped buying them though. This was because I kept forgetting to put them in my Amazon cart and then I eventually kind of forgot about them.

For the past year or two, I have started to keep around red raspberry leaf teabags. I have begun to use it sporadically again- a couple days before my period begins when I have nausea. It takes the discomfort away pretty quickly which is great. I also drink some the first day of my period as it diminishes any cramps I may get.

I am planning to buy the capsules and start taking them everyday instead of just a few days a month. I am not going to get my hopes up but it would be nice to have even less symptoms than I have now (Claritin hasn’t been a complete cure)!

I will also keep the tea around to help with sore throats, coughs and possible immune system benefits.

These leaves could help you!

So, I typed all of this to say that this may be an option for people if they are struggling with their menstrual cycles and have not yet tried these leaves. It sure has helped me a lot and I am glad I found out about it.

Have any of you tried red raspberry leaves? If so, did they help you at all?

Thanks for reading!

Affiliate disclaimer: Some of the links on my site might be affiliate. This means I may make a commission on any clicks and purchases people make.

Medical disclaimer: I am not a medical professional and I am not telling you what to do in regards to your health. Consult your doctor for an evaluation before taking any herb or supplement.

#periodcrampsrelief #redraspberryleaf #traditionalmedicine #hormonalimbalance #pms #pmddtreatment #menstrualcup #tea #chamomiletea

Zinc: What It Can Do for Hormones

Zinc: What It Can Do for Hormones

Many women/non-binary people with hormonal conditions are willing to try a lot of things to reduce or eliminate the accompanying symptoms of them. While there are medical interventions that exist, some are still interested in going the supplement route.

Zinc is one of the supplements that is said to possibly help with hormonal conditions and we are going talk all about it in this post!

Introduction to Zinc

Zinc is one of 118 chemical elements with an atomic number of 30. It is essential for living things due to the roles it has in keeping organisms healthy. In humans it is responsible for regulation and helping with the proper functioning of various systems.

The human body stores it in various places (i.e. organs and cells) but it is not found naturally in us. To obtain zinc, we need to either get it from food and/or take a supplement.

This mineral is used for industrial, supplemental and topical (ointments and creams) related purposes.

In terms of supplements, zinc comes in different types. These include gummies, liquids, lozenges, capsules and tablets. Some of them have the zinc combined with other minerals/vitamins or it is by itself.

There are several forms of zinc which include acetate, gluconate, picolinate, orotate, sulfate and citrate. These forms differ when it comes to absorbability, price and what it could specifically do for our health.

In terms of food, zinc is found in a variety of things. The foods with the highest amount of it include beef, pork, oysters, tofu, chicken, cashews, oatmeal and mushrooms.

Zinc and hormonal conditions

Zinc supplementation has shown to have some positive effects when it comes hormonal issues that plague many women/non-binary people. This is said to possibly be because of zinc’s ability to regulate hormones.

. The following are the hormonal related issues that supplementing with zinc may help with:

  • Fertility- Studies suggest that zinc may help shorten the time that it takes to get pregnant.
  • Metabolic syndrome in people with PCOS- A sufficient amount of zinc is essential for insulin regulation and for having a proper response to it. It also reduces glucose and triglyceride levels. Getting all of this under control reduces the risk for things like diabetes and heart disease.
  • Painful menstrual cramps- This problem is also called, dysmenorrhea. It is very common and can get in the way of having a quality life. Studies show that zinc has anti-inflammatory actions that may prevent and treat the painful cramps.
  • PMS- For some women, the levels of zinc get lower in the luteal phase (after ovulation and the two weeks before your period starts). Getting one’s zinc levels up during this time may reduce the brain sluggishness, mood swings and bad sleep.
  • Acne-The anti-inflammatory action that zinc has may help with the acne that can come with hormonal issues.
  • Excess hair- Many people with PCOS have too much androgens which then causes excess hair to form in unwanted areas (i.e. upper lip and chin). Zinc is shown to have anti-androgen effects so it may help reduce the amount of hair that is grown.

The above reasons are why quite a few professionals (the ones that are okay with supplements) that specialize in women’s/non-binary health recommend zinc supplementation for hormonal issues.

Magnesium and calcium are two other supplements that are touted as being great for hormones. Luckily, you can find products that contain all three things in one! An example of a combination product is this one by Solaray.

The dosage for zinc should be no more than 50 mg per day to avoid negative side effects. These uncomfortable effects include GI issues, chest pain, fatigue and headaches.

Other things zinc can do for our health

There are quite a few other things that zinc is said to possibly do for us. They are as follows:

  • Increase the strength of our immune systems.
  • Improve the frequency and severity of acne.
  • Improve age related vision loss.
  • Reduce signs of ADHD if taken with prescription medication.
  • Shorten lengths of colds.
  • Improve low moods.
  • Improve brain fog and memory issues.
  • Improve smell and taste ability.
  • Heal bed sores and diaper rash when applied in cream form.
  • Help with male fertility issues.
  • Help improve metabolic syndrome markers.

As with any supplement, the benefits of zinc are not definitive. However, there is a lot of good evidence for them.

Our favorite supplements

My husband and I both take zinc. I had stopped for a while but ever since I did more research on it- I have started taking it again. This is partly because I noticed that my cramps got worse when I stopped taking it (I use a health journal everyday!.

If you have a sensitive stomach, the lozenges I use are a great option. You can find them here.

My husband does not have a sensitive stomach by any sense of the word. Because of this, he is able to take a larger dosed pill from Nature’s Bounty that may be hard on some people’s stomach. You can find the product here.

Zinc may be the thing to try

If you are struggling with hormonal problems, you could give zinc a try. It may not cure you but it could end up helping you a little bit.

Are any of you taking zinc? If so, what do you feel it is doing for you?

Thanks for reading!

Affiliate disclaimer: Some of the links on my blog may be affiliate links. This means I will get a commission on any clicks and purchases you make.

Health disclaimer: I am not a doctor or any kind of a medical professional. I am not telling you what to do and nothing I say is a substitute for professional medical advice. You should consult with your doctor before making changes that could affect your health.

#zincsupplement #immunesystem #hormonalproblems #pms #pmddtreatment #pcos #health #women #nonbinary

Body Acne Is Back: Plan of Attack

Body Acne Is Back: Plan of Attack

My body acne looks similar to face acne.

I realize how tacky the title of this post sounds and I apologize. It is an accurate summary of what I will be talking about though.

I had body acne before but it went away. Well, now it is back! This means that I have to have a plan for how I am going to get rid of it.

This post will go into what I am going to do and maybe it will help others that are dealing with body acne as well.

About body acne

A lot of people think that acne only happens on the face. They are really wrong! Acne can happen anywhere skin is (which is everywhere).

Common places for body acne include the chest (chestne), shoulders and back (bacne). People also complain (and laugh sometimes) about butt acne.

The main causes of zit formation anywhere are clogged pores, excess dead skin cells and bacteria. When it comes to what can cause these aforementioned causes of zit formation, you are looking at the following:

  • Hormones: These pesky things seem to cause a lot of bad things to happen when they are out of wack and/or shifting. You tend to see this being the cause in women with PCOS who have a high amount of androgens or react poorly to the amount they have.
  • Being a teenager: Walking the halls of a high school- you will see that this is true. Don’t actually do that though.
  • Medications and steroids: This includes things like birth control, Lithium, testosterone, cold medicine, Adderall and thyroid medications.
  • Mental health conditions (stress, anxiety and depression)- Our mental health can affect our physical health. This means that it can cause acne.
  • Genes-There may be some genes that cause people to struggle with acne.
  • Skincare products: Some products like soaps and oils can irritate some people’s skin which in turn can cause acne.

When it comes to body acne, there can be some other causes that are more specific to that type. They are as follows:

  • Sweat left on the skin for too long: If you work out hard and sweat a lot, not showering afterwards can lead to acne.
  • Laundry detergent issues: Our skin may not like some laundry detergent and thus acne may form.
  • Body care products: Our skin may not like some body washes we use which may cause acne to form.
  • Not washing bedding enough: Having dirty bedding may cause acne to form on your body.

Having body acne can be detrimental to one’s mental health just as acne on the face can be. Some may feel like they do not look very good in certain outfits and try to cover up. This also may make them shy away from certain situations (like going to the beach).

Luckily, the treatment options that exist for face acne are pretty much the same for body acne as well. Here are some of them:

  • Benzoyl peroxide: Comes in creams, gels, patches, face washes and body washes by various brands.
  • Salicylic acid: Comes in creams, gels, body washes, patches and chemical peels.
  • Glycolic acid: Comes in chemical peels, body washes, face washes, lotions and serums.
  • Niacinamide: Comes in creams, gels, lotions and serums.
  • Retinol: Comes in creams, gels and lotions.
  • Tretinoin: Comes in creams and gels.
  • Mandelic acid: Comes in chemical peels, face washes, body washes, serums and toners.
  • Adapalene (Differin): Comes in gel form.
  • Antibiotics: These include clindamycin, doxycycline and erythromycin.
  • Accutane
  • Blue light therapy: Some spas offer this service or you can buy a blue light therapy wand/lamp on various sites.

My body acne situation

I have struggled with acne for a very long time but before it was only on my face. In recent years I have had pimples show up on my body as well. I have gotten them virtually everywhere except for my calves!

I went through a five month phase a while back where I was struggling with back acne a lot. It all seemed to clear up on its own which was great. Unfortunately, I am dealing with a lot of bacne again as well as chestne and shoulder acne.

I have different types of acne lesions on my body. They are as follows:

  • Back- Whiteheads, papules and cysts.
  • Shoulders- Papules and whiteheads.
  • Chest- Papules

Ugh!

This time I do not want to wait for it to clear up on its own because who knows if that will even happen. That means I have to have a plan in place with products I am going to use.

There have been some products I have used on my body acne areas before but they really didn’t work. Here is what I have used:

  • CeraVe salicylic acid body wash
  • Alpha Skin Care glycolic acid lotion
  • Kojic acid soap
  • Makeup Artist’s Choice 5 Acid Body Peel
  • Sulfur soap- Only very sporadically, to be honest.
  • 30% glycolic acid peel

I believe that my body acne is due to my PCOS diagnosis. My hormonal levels have been in the normal range when they were tested but it is clear that my body is sensitive to the levels I do have.

My plan of attack

In addition to my acne, I also struggle with hyperpigmentation after the lesions heal. These dark marks are even harder to make go away so I will just be focusing on getting rid of the lesions right now.

My plan is pretty simple. It involves using a sulfur soap everyday on my areas with acne followed up by a fragrance free lotion. I will also be trying out the Mighty Patch on some of my lesions. If those aren’t working after several weeks, I will start using PanOxyl benzoyl peroxide body wash.

In conclusion

Body acne sucks! It is good that the treatments for our faces can also be for our bodies too though.

I really hope that my plan works and I am excited to get started. Look out for an update in a few weeks time if you are interested!

Do you struggle with body acne? If so, what are using to clear it up?

Thanks for reading!

Disclaimer: Some of the links on my blog might be affiliate. This means that if you click on them and make a purchase- I get some of the money.

#acne #skincare #skinproblems #tretinoin #beauty #pcos #pcosawareness #hormonalproblems #pms #pmddtreatment

Current Supplement Stack (Summer 2021) + Ideas for You!

Current Supplement Stack (Summer 2021) + Ideas for You!

I have been a supplement junkie for some time now. As good or bad as that may be-it just is what it is.

Over the years, I have taken many different supplements that I thought would help various physical and mental things. Some of them helped, possibly helped, didn’t help at all or made things worse.

Since I switch up the things that I am taking on a semi-regular basis, I decided to do a post on my current stack!

Getting into supplements

What got me into researching and taking supplements was reading about the benefits of different types of herbs at my local library. There were a lot of books on them and I just found it all so interesting. This led me to eventually reading about vitamins, minerals and antioxidants as well.

It wasn’t until sometime in college ( about four years later), that I actually began taking supplements. The first one I ever took was vitamin B Complex. This was recommended to me by the therapist I was seeing at the time. She said that it may help with my mood so I rushed out to get it!

The vitamin B Complex gave me a noticeable mood boost plus a little bit of physical energy. I took them daily for a while but then stopped.

After I really started getting into fitness, I became interested in supplements that were marketed for fat loss and physical performance during exercise. I tried quite a few different products by different brands.

After using the fat loss and physical performance products for a while, I began to get interested in supplements that could possibly extend my life. I then dropped the other supplements and started taking these ones.

I eventually slowed down on taking supplements to where I was only taking one or two daily. That all ended when the pandemic started. I was (and still am!) terrified of this virus so I started taking things that I thought would help prevent and treat it if I got it again.

My current supplement stack

I dealt with post-COVID symptoms for a long time. I am not sure if all of the supplements helped or if time did. Since I got my Moderna shots and started to feel back to normal, I changed around what I take.

Here are is what I take now and why (will also include OTC medications):

  • 6,000 IUs of Vitamin D3- I take this to hopefully boost my immune system, treat a deficiency I may have and to help out my bones.
  • 1,000 mg of Vitamin C- I take this just for the antioxidant benefit.
  • 100 mg of CoQ10- I take this for the heart and blood pressure lowering benefits.
  • 1000 mcg of B12- I first began taking this to help with some post-COVID issues such as tinnitus, possible nerve issues and my mood. I don’t know if it has actually helped me but I will continue to take it anyway as it is not hurting me. The one I take is time-release because those don’t hurt my stomach at all.
  • 50 mg of B6- I take this because it is great for women’s health- PMS in particular. I do notice a difference when it comes to breast pain leading up to my period.
  • SuperGreen Tea Immunity- I drink three cups of this a day for the immune system benefits.
  • 1,100 mg of ginger- This is for my stomach issues but I honestly don’t think it really helps. After this container I might not buy anymore and just get ginger from the tea I drink.
  • Tummy Tuneup probiotics- I take these probiotics to help out my gut. I will be doing a review on them soon.
  • 40 mg of Pepcid- This is for my Mast Cell issue. It is to help my GERD and GI issues.
  • 5-10 mg of Claritin- This is also for my Mast Cell issue. Taking this has really helped with pain, itching and hives that I get frequently.
  • 1 cup of Welch’s Grape juice- My family and I drink this everyday to prevent stomach viruses. We have been doing this for years after reading about it on a parenting blog.
  • 1 Brazil nut- I take this to meet my daily selenium requirements. I take this because it could possibly help with PCOS. After I finish the bag of nuts, I will probably not buy anymore as it really isn’t necessary.

If you are reading this and have kids, I thought you would be interested in reading what I give to my son. The following are what he gets on a daily basis:

  • Echinacea syrup- I just started giving this to him in hopes that it will boost his immune system. He loves the taste and takes it straight but other kids would probably do better with it mixed into their drinks. I give him 30 drops a day.
  • Smarty Pants vitamin gummies- My son absolutely loves these! They are packed with a blend of great vitamins and also include omega-3s.
  • 1 packet of Culturelle Probiotic powder- I mix this into my son’s juice in hopes that it will help his gut and immune system.
  • 1/2 tsp of liquid colostrum- I mix this into my son’s juice in hopes that it will help his immune system.

Some ideas for you

I do realize that it is best to get all your nutrients from food. It can be hard to do so however. Plus, I think some people need extra of certain ones than others do.

The following are some delicious foods that you can eat on a regular basis to get some of the nutrients that I take:

  • Omelets with mushrooms-This gives you a good amount of vitamin D, B vitamins, selenium and more.
  • Regular yogurt with fresh or frozen strawberries- This gives you some good probiotics for your gut along with vitamin C and CoQ10 from the strawberries.
  • Chicken and lentils- Recipes using these two ingredients will provide a lot of B vitamin goodness! This Moroccan chicken and lentils recipe is a good one to try.
  • Ginger tea- Instead of buying capsules, you can make tea using fresh ginger. Just slice some up and boil it on the stovetop. You can add honey to it if you want. This drink may help with things like nausea, cold symptoms and possibly menstrual cramps.

So, there it is!

This is what I am taking right now. I will probably make some changes to my stack but most of it will always be there.

Do you take any supplements? If so, which ones?

Thanks for reading!

#supplements #health #fitness #womenshealth #covid19 #supplementstack #immunesystem

*Disclaimer: I am not a doctor, so therefore I am not here to diagnose and treat anyone. These are just supplements I have made the decision to use. Always consult with your doctor if you want to start taking supplements.

*I have linked affiliate products on this blog post. This means that if you click on them and make a purchase, I will get some money out of it.